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LR30

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Sewer lift stations collect wastewater streams from residential, commercial or public buildings, and transfer their contents to a municipal plant for treatment. Hence, everything we flush down a drain, ends up in a sewer lift station. Lift stations are below grade, gravity fed cylindrical sumps, constructed of concrete or fiberglass with depths ranging from 6 to 30 feet. They are typically daisy chained together to create a liquid highway through which wastewater can be transported over many miles, from source to treatment. There are three main application segments in the lift station market including industrial wastewater, municipal sewer and municipal storm water. Wastewater enters lift stations from the top and is removed from the bottom using two transfer pumps. The pumps are typically submersed within the sump or located next to the lift station in a pump house. Lift stations are crowded, dynamic environments with ladders, pipes, pumps, rails, electrical, sensors and waste streams pouring in from one or more sources. Wastewater can be dirty, foaming, viscous or oily with sludge and particulates, making it difficult to measure reliably. The primary requirement for this application is to monitor the liquid level, periodically transfer the wastewater from the lift station to another location, and prevent it from overflowing or running dry.

LR30

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Stormwater lift stations collect rain and melting snow or ice from urban streets and highways to control flooding, reclaim water and protect the environment. If it washes down a street drain, it ends up in a stormwater lift station. Lift stations are below grade, gravity fed cylindrical or rectangular sumps, constructed of concrete or fiberglass with depths ranging from 6 to 30 feet. When full, they transfer their contents, and are typically daisy chained together to create a liquid highway through which stormwater can be transported over miles. The final destination is normally a pond, reservoir, treatment plant or the ocean. There are three main application segments in the lift station market including industrial wastewater, municipal sewer and municipal stormwater. Stormwater enters lift stations from the top and is removed from the bottom using two or more transfer pumps. The pumps are typically submersed within the sump or located next to the lift station in a pump house. Lift stations are crowded, dynamic environments with ladders, pipes, pumps, rails, electrical, sensors and water streams pouring in from one or more sources. Stormwater can be dirty or oily with particulates, trash and debris, making it difficult to measure reliably. The primary requirement for this application is to monitor the liquid level, periodically transfer the stormwater from the lift station to another location, and prevent it from overflowing or running dry.

DL24

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Life science exhibits house living aquatic species for public viewing at aquariums, marine parks, zoos and hotels. Regardless of the animal type, the provision and maintenance of clean water is a critical requirement. Within the life science market, there are three main application segments including the pre-treatment of water prior to being introduced to the exhibit, the monitoring of the exhibit itself, and the post-treatment of wastewater after its been removed from the exhibit. Exhibit tanks range widely in depth and capacity based upon the species, their requirements and the scenery such as rocks, plants, water features and backdrops. The support equipment is typically located behind the exhibit or hidden within the scenery. To maintain water quality and make up for evaporation, water is continuously circulated in and out of the exhibit. The post-treatment system receives wastewater from the exhibit, treats it to specification, removing physical or biological contaminants, and either recirculates it back into the exhibit or releases it to the municipal sewer or environment. A post-treatment system typically includes a storage tank to collect the wastewater, a neutralization tank to treat the wastewater and chemical feed tanks to supply the neutralization process. The storage tank can be above ground or below grade with an open or enclosed top, and is normally constructed of plastic, fiberglass or concrete. The neutralization tank is typically a plastic or fiberglass tank with an open or enclosed top and mixer for agitation. The chemical feed tanks are plastic day tanks, IBC totes or drums with enclosed tops. The primary requirement for this application is to monitor the liquid level in each tank, ensuring that the levels are maintained within their operational ranges, and either refilling the day tank or notifying the operator when additional chemical supply is needed prior to running out.

DL14

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Life science exhibits house living aquatic species for public viewing at aquariums, marine parks, zoos and hotels. Regardless of the animal type, the provision and maintenance of clean water is a critical requirement. Within the life science market, there are three main application segments including the pre-treatment of water prior to being introduced to the exhibit, the monitoring of the exhibit itself, and the post-treatment of wastewater after its been removed from the exhibit. Exhibit tanks range widely in depth and capacity based upon the species, their requirements and the scenery such as rocks, plants, water features and backdrops. The support equipment is typically located behind the exhibit or hidden within the scenery. To maintain water quality and make up for evaporation, water is continuously circulated in and out of the exhibit. The pre-treatment system receives new water from a municipal or natural source such as the ocean, or reclaimed water from the post-treatment system, and removes any solids or impurities before introducing that water into the exhibit. A pre-treatment system typically includes a filtration system with chemical feed tanks, and storage tanks to hold the treated water. The storage tanks are normally above ground plastic or fiberglass tanks with enclosed tops. The chemical feed tanks are plastic day tanks, IBC totes or drums with enclosed tops. The primary requirement for this application is to monitor the liquid level in each tank, ensuring that the levels are maintained within their operational ranges, and either refilling the day tank or notifying the operator when additional chemical supply is needed prior to running out.

DL14

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Life science exhibits house living aquatic species for public viewing at aquariums, marine parks, zoos and hotels. Regardless of the animal type, the provision and maintenance of clean water is a critical requirement. Within the life science market, there are three main application segments including the pre-treatment of water prior to being introduced to the exhibit, the monitoring of the exhibit itself, and the post-treatment of wastewater after its been removed from the exhibit. Exhibit tanks range widely in depth and capacity based upon the species, their environmental requirements and associated display scenery such as rocks, plants, water features and backdrops. The support equipment is typically located behind the exhibit or hidden within the scenery. To maintain water quality and make up for evaporation, water is continuously circulated in and out of the exhibit. The primary requirement for this application is to monitor the liquid level, maintain it, and prevent it from rising or falling to levels that would endanger the inhabitants.

DL14

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Cooling towers are heat exchange systems that bring air and water into direct contact with each other in order to reduce the temperature of the water. To accomplish this, water is continuously pumped to the top of the tower, where it cascades over a series of baffles, mixes with air, and collects in either a basin located directly under the tower or a sump next to the tower. As heat and water escapes the tower through evaporation, additional water must be periodically added to the system. Cooling towers come in a variety of sizes from roof top systems to those the size of buildings or even larger. The typical water basin is open to air, 4’ or less in depth, constructed of fiberglass, metal or concrete, and large enough in capacity to hold all of the water in the system. Cooling towers have two basic control systems, one to add liquid into the basin, and one to turn the water recirculation system on or off. The primary requirement for this application is to monitor the liquid level, automatically refill the basin, and prevent the system from running dry.

DL14

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Chemical feed systems inject precise amounts of chemicals into processes to produce water fit for a specific purpose, maintain process efficiency, protect equipment and minimize costs. Chemical feed is separated into three main application segments including cooling, boiler and water treatment. Each requires a chemical feed system that basically includes a metering pump, storage tank and level sensor. Chemical feed tanks are small and often stand alone. They’re typically plastic mini-bulk tanks around 6’ in height, or IBC totes between 3’-6’ in height, or drums or pails that are 3’ or less in height. While purification requirements and processes differ in industrial, municipal and commercial applications, chemical feed plays a common role in water treatment. The primary requirement for this application is to monitor the liquid level and notify the operator when additional chemical supply is needed prior to running out, thus maintaining water integrity. Mini-bulk tanks are typically refilled from tanker trucks, while IBC totes, drums or pails are exchanged.

DL14

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Chemical feed systems inject precise amounts of chemicals into processes to maintain efficiency, protect equipment and minimize costs. Chemical feed is separated into three main application segments including cooling, boiler and water treatment. Each requires a chemical feed system that basically includes a metering pump, storage tank and level sensor. Chemical feed tanks are small and often stand alone. They’re typically plastic mini-bulk tanks around 6’ in height, or IBC totes between 3’-6’ in height, or drums or pails that are 3’ or less in height. Boilers generate and maintain heated water or steam for use in facility processes. City water contains impurities such as phosphates, chelants and polymers that are treated with chemicals at the boiler. The primary requirement for this application is to monitor the liquid level and notify the operator when additional chemical supply is needed prior to running out, thus maintaining the integrity of the boiler. Mini-bulk tanks are typically refilled from tanker trucks, while IBC totes, drums or pails are exchanged.

XP88-89

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Above ground bulk storage tanks are containers that hold large volumes of liquid and typically range from 10 to 32 feet in height. They operate under no pressure, are available in many shapes, and are widely manufactured out of plastic, fiberglass or metal. Vertical cylindrical tanks are the most common. Depending upon the liquid, they may also have a chemically resistant inner lining. There are many environmental regulations associated with the design and operation of bulk storage tanks, and above ground tanks have different regulations than below ground tanks. Bulk storage tanks have two basic control systems, one to add liquid into the tank and one to remove liquid from the tank. Some also have secondary containment walls to prevent spills or leakage, and all have good transportation access to support deliveries. The primary requirement for this application is to monitor the liquid level, enabling operators to know when it’s time to refill the tank, and prevent it from overflowing or running dry.

LG10/LG11

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When a Colorado municipality needed reliable level measurement of their polymer feed tanks, they turned to Flowline. Organic flocculants are widely used in water treatment for clarification. Their polymer chains attract suspended solids to form flocs that precipitate during settling, thus leaving clear water behind. Polymer is very sticky and the operators had problems with previous conductance level sensors that required ongoing maintenance due to coating build-up. For this reason, Flowline suggested the use of our non-contact, ultrasonic liquid level sensors that are unaffected by sticky liquids. The ultrasonic sensor provides reliable level data to the SCADA, which in turn, monitors the polymer feed tanks. Flowline is reliable level measurement.